Files

Download

Download Complete Bulletin (583 KB)

Publication Date

1-2005

Series Number

4617

Abstract

A channel that is 1.0 m to 3.0 m in depth is considered to be a deep drain. The drain is excavated to a depth that is sufficient to intercept the watertable in order to capture and convey that groundwater from flat, poorly drained land.

The drain can either be ‘open’ to allow the inflow of surface water or ‘leeved’ to exclude surface water. An open deep drain has its spoil banks placed on one side or on alternate sides of the channel (Figure 1) while a leveed deep drain has continuous spoil banks placed on both sides of the drain channel (Figure 2). Leveed drains are the preferred design in the majority of cases and sites because they prevent surface flows from entering the drain and so reduce the risk of erosion and drain batter collapse.

Number of Pages

12

ISSN

1448-0352

Keywords

Subsurface drainage, Drainage, Salinity, Groundwater, Engineering, Western Australia

Disciplines

Construction Engineering and Management

Maps

Maps are not included as part of the complete document download. If this report contains a map, it will be available in the individual parts list below.

Deep drains to manage groundwater

Share

COinS