Files

Download

Download Complete Bulletin (366 KB)

Publication Date

2-2001

Series Number

4491

Abstract

Canola is a member of the Brassicaceae family that also includes mustard, turnip, wild radish, cauliflower, cabbage and broccoli.

It is a winter growing oilseed that can be produced in most arable areas of Australia where winter crops are currently grown. Originally known as rapeseed using the varieties B. campestris, the varieties of B. napus have almost completely replaced this earlier variety in all the areas where the crop is grown.

The swing to B. napus varieties was due to their superior yields, resistance to blackleg and better quality oil and meal. Canola can be grown on a wide variety of soil types, and is best in areas where spring rains are reliable and high in order to allow it to reach maximum potential yield. It is not as drought tolerant as wheat, thus requiring good conserved moisture or good finishing rains. Canola requires an average annual rainfall of at least 450 mm, however experience has shown that the crop can be viable in areas with an annual rainfall down to less than 325 mm.

Number of Pages

42

ISSN

1326-415X

Keywords

Harvesting, Fertilizers, Crop yield, Insect pests, Canola, Weed control, Insect control, Plant nutrition, Plant diseases, Western Australia

Disciplines

Agronomy and Crop Sciences | Weed Science

Comments

2nd edition; Revised by Craig Topham and Paul McKenzie

Profitable canola production in the northern grainbelt of Western Australia 2001

Share

COinS